Supporting Schools, Supporting Teachers:

New Grant Program Invests in Great Ideas for High-Quality Teacher Retention and Recruitment

As part of our North Star – ensuring every kid graduates from high school college and career-ready – Opportunity 180 invests in great schools and educators providing educational experiences that give students a foundation for their success. 

A major challenge that schools face today is an ongoing teacher shortage, and moreover, a shortage of teachers a TNTP study calls “Irreplaceables.” According to the study, “Teachers of this caliber provide more engaging learning experiences for students and help them achieve five to six more months of learning each year than students of low-performing teachers – academic results that can be life-changing.” 

Therefore, to further the pipeline of quality teachers in Clark County and build the conditions that support and strengthen them, we are thrilled to announce four grants totaling nearly $500,000 to be used specifically to recruit and retain high-quality teachers, with an emphasis on ensuring more teachers represent the backgrounds of their students and cultivating more “Irreplaceables” right here in Southern Nevada. The grants begin this summer. 

“This is the first time Opportunity 180 has awarded these types of grants, and we are so proud to do so with four of our partner schools: Democracy Prep at the Agassi Campus, Futuro Academy, Nevada Rise Academy, and TEACH Las Vegas,” said Jana Wilcox Lavin, CEO of Opportunity 180. “These grants will be specifically directed towards initiatives that give educators and school leaders the resources they need to teach effectively, stay in Nevada schools, and help our kids graduate from high school college and career-ready.”

These four schools are located in economically disadvantaged areas of the Las Vegas Valley where the majority are students of color, underscoring the importance of ensuring teachers represent their student populations. A recent discussion at Brookings Institution’s Brown Center for Education Policy noted that diversity can be a “critical element of a quality education,” and, “one of the ways to close long-standing race-based achievement gaps is to expose more students to teachers who look like them.” Working to intentionally address representation and voice will impact academic outcomes for these students, making it an important focus for teacher retention and recruitment efforts in these historically marginalized communities. 

To cultivate these high-performing learning and working environments, the grantees will incorporate new, as well as tried and tested, ways to recruit, develop, and retain high-quality teachers at their campuses, including:

  • Creating and incubating an induction and mentoring program to promote growth and development of teachers early in their teaching careers. 
  • Connecting instructional design opportunities through peer mentoring, classroom observations and feedback, coaching on formative assessments, and case/lesson studies on instructional design
  • Providing additional pathways for teachers to be cultivated into administrative and leadership roles
  • Engaging staff in various professional development opportunities, including coaching, curricula development, and a mini-residency program
  • Providing performance-based retention incentives to teachers
  • Working with organizations to set aside time for dedicated time on a regular basis for educators to help formalize development tools and programs geared towards collaboration

Creating conditions for great teachers to stay in classrooms and cultivate engaging learning experiences and environments is a critical piece to improving student outcomes, as well as ensuring that teachers represent their student populations. These grants will pilot retention strategies that keep our “Irreplaceables” in the classroom, demonstrating firsthand that great teachers and great ideas make way for great schools and better student outcomes.

Congratulations to Democracy Prep at the Agassi Campus, Futuro Academy, Nevada Rise Academy, and TEACH Las Vegas on this exciting funding opportunity. Stay tuned for more updates on these programs as we share learnings, progress, and outcomes!

Nevada Ed-Watch: 06/23/22

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on what decisions are being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Clark County School District Board of Trustees 

What is the Board of Trustees & what are they responsible for? The CCSD Trustees are publicly elected decision-makers for the school district. They are responsible for providing oversight to the Superintendent and establishing District-wide policy. Trustees are accountable to work with their communities to improve student achievement.

Click here to learn more and see a list of current Trustees
Click here to find your Trustee District

How often does the Board of Trustees meet? Trustees meet twice per month (second and fourth Thursdays) at 5 pm both virtually and at the Edward A. Greer Education Center Board Room (2832 E Flamingo Rd, Las Vegas, NV 89121).

Click here for a full list of Trustees meetings and agendas
Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar

Can community members engage at Trustee meetings? Decision-making bodies benefit greatly from hearing public input and multiple perspectives. Currently, members of the public can submit comments on agenda and non-agenda items through email or voice recording. Public comment can be provided in person, via email, or via voice recording. Email comments should be submitted to Boardmtgcomments@nv.ccsd.net. To submit a voice recording on items listed on the meeting agenda, call 702-799-1166. Voice recorded public comment is limited to 1 minute 30 seconds.


Thursday, June 23, 2022

Clark County School District Board of Trustees Meeting

Click here to see the meeting agenda.
Watch the meeting playback on CCSD EduVision.

What happened at this meeting?

Public Comment #1 on Non-Agenda Items

Members of the public shared comments regarding:

  • Student safety and bullying
  • Support staff salaries
  • Qualifications for substitute teachers
  • District staff responsiveness
  • Equity in school district policies

Trustees Approved the Consent Agenda (5-1-0)

Consent Agenda Highlights:

Explore consent agenda items here.

One Trustee abstained from voting on this item.

Trustees Heard a Presentation on Teacher Retention

Staff presented on the current state of teaching positions and vacancies in the District. From the 2016-2017 school year to the 2021-2022 school year, student enrollment decreased by 15,777 students and the licensed employee count decreased by 56 employees. Initial findings from staff include a significant increase in the number of planned licensed positions over the last seven years is outpacing the number of teachers the district can hire; and planned full-time equivalent positions include attempts to reduce class sizes and an increase in non-classroom licensed positions.

Staff also provided a vacancy update thus far for the 2022-2023 school year. Schools with the highest vacancy percentages are concentrated around the North Las Vegas area, with the highest vacancy percentages ranging between 20% and 40.74%. Seventy-nine percent of students at schools with at least a 20% teacher vacancy percentage are Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino.

School impact findings include vacancy rates not equitably distributed among all schools and student groups, as well as a challenge for the District in serving the schools with the greatest need and providing smaller class sizes for all students. Steps that were recommended include increased marketing for the new starting teacher salaries; incentivizing licensed staff to be hired and retained at schools with the greatest need; exploring alternate certification pathways and licensing requirements and reciprocity; and improving working conditions through implementing Multi-Tier Systems of Support and capacity-building for new and/or struggling teachers. 

Explore the presentation.

Trustees Held a Public Hearing on and Approved a New Memorandum of Agreement Between CCSD and the Education Support Employees Association Regarding Article 19-4-2 of the Negotiated Agreement (5-1-0)

Trustees approved a new Memorandum of Understanding between CCSD and the Education Support Employees Association that provides that any bus driver or special education bus driver starting between January 1, 2022 and July 1, 2022, will move to Step B-1 and will remain at that step until the one-year anniversary of their hire date.

One trustee abstained from voting on this item.

Explore the Memorandum of Agreement and public hearing materials.

Trustees Held a Public Hearing on and Approved a Second Amendment to the Negotiated Agreement between CCSD and the Education Support Employee Association Regarding Changes in Language in Article 20 (5-1-0)

Trustees approved a second amendment to the negotiated agreement between CCSD and the Education Support Employee Association’s 2021-2023 Negotiated Agreement.  The amendment increases the contribution by CCSD to the ESEA Group Health Insurance program, with a fiscal impact of $6.6 million.

One trustee abstained from voting on this item.

Explore the amendment and public hearing materials.

Trustees Held a Public Hearing on and Approved an Amendment to the Negotiated Agreement between CCSD and the Clark County Association of School Administrators and Professional-Technical Employees (CCASAPE) Regarding Article 16-3 (6-0)

Trustees approved an amendment to the Negotiated Agreement between CCSD and CCASAPE. The amendment to Article 16-3 changes the language to provide clarity to procedures regarding placement of administrators on the approved salary scale and brings the Article into compliance with SB 293 of the 2021 Legislature.  There is no fiscal impact to this amendment.

Explore the amendment and public hearing materials.

Trustees Held a Public Hearing on and Approved the New Memorandum of Agreement between CCSD and the CCASAPE Regarding Summer Pay for Principals Recently Moved to 12-Month Contracts (6-0)

Trustees conducted a public hearing on and approved a new Memorandum of Agreement between CCSD and CCASAPE to address pay for certain principals who were recently moved to 12-month contracts and who will be working during June (and in some cases July) in the Extended School Year program, or who will be opening new schools or replacement schools. The fiscal impact of the Memorandum is approximately $560,000.

Explore the Memorandum of Agreement and public hearing materials.

Public Comment #2 on Non-Agenda Items

Members of the public shared comments on this item regarding: 

  • Public comment periods at CCSD Board of Trustees meetings
  • Literacy and mathematics goals
  • Improving educational equity and strategies for increasing educational equity

The next Meeting of the Board of Trustees is scheduled for July 14, 2022, at 5:00 p.m. 

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Nevada Ed-Watch: 06/09/2022

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on what decisions are being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Clark County School District Board of Trustees 

What is the Board of Trustees & what are they responsible for? The CCSD Trustees are publicly elected decision-makers for the school district. They are responsible for providing oversight to the Superintendent and establishing District-wide policy. Trustees are accountable to work with their communities to improve student achievement.

Click here to learn more and see a list of current Trustees
Click here to find your Trustee District

How often does the Board of Trustees meet? Trustees meet twice per month (second and fourth Thursdays) at 5 pm both virtually and at the Edward A. Greer Education Center Board Room (2832 E Flamingo Rd, Las Vegas, NV 89121).

Click here for a full list of Trustees meetings and agendas
Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar

Can community members engage at Trustee meetings? Decision-making bodies benefit greatly from hearing public input and multiple perspectives. Currently, members of the public can submit comments on agenda and non-agenda items through email or voice recording. Public comment can be provided in person, via email, or via voice recording. Email comments should be submitted to Boardmtgcomments@nv.ccsd.net. To submit a voice recording on items listed on the meeting agenda, call 702-799-1166. Voice recorded public comment is limited to 1 minute 30 seconds.


Thursday, June 9, 2022

Clark County School District Board of Trustees Meeting

Click here to see the meeting agenda.
Watch the meeting playback on Facebook or CCSD EduVision.

What happened at this meeting?

Public Comment #1 on Non-Agenda Items

Members of the public shared comments regarding:

  • New starting salaries and existing teacher salaries
  • Community representation
  • Teacher retention
  • School safety
  • School accountability for child endangerment and neglect
  • Student outcomes and perception of Trustees to students
  • District workplace culture
  • School funding
  • Trustee behavior
  • Union representation
  • Student safety
  • Workplace discrimination

Trustees Approved the Consent Agenda (5-2)

Consent Agenda Highlights:

Explore consent agenda items here.

Trustees approved the consent agenda, pulling items 3.37 – Appointment of Bond Oversight Committee members, and 3.38 – CCSD Regulation 5114.1, Discipline: Suspension Procedures. One nominee on Item 3.37 was approved to serve on the Committee by a 7-0 vote, while the other nominee was not approved. Item 3.38 passed separately by a 6-1 vote.

Trustees Heard a Presentation on Focus 2024: Strategic Plan Update – Student Discipline

Staff presented on student suspensions and discretionary expulsions, which are tracking higher during the 2021-2022 school year. Staff noted that the 2020-2021 data is not comparative because at the time the data was pulled, the school year had not yet been completed. Through March 11, 2022, there have been 18,860 student suspensions (compared with 19,631 for the full 2019-2020 school year) and 733 discretionary expulsions (compared with 625 for the full 2019-2020 school year).

Challenges include disproportionality, major disciplinary infractions, and Q3 history; district successes include external stakeholder collaboration and data tracking. Next steps include revising the CCSD Pre-K-12 Student Code of Conduct in June and Student Record Guidance in July 2022.

Explore the presentation.

Trustees Heard a Presentation on Focus 2024: Strategic Plan Update – Nevada System of Higher Education Remediation Rates

Staff presented on higher education remediation rates. Remediation is defined as students who are enrolled in remedial math or English coursework at a Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) institution. Remediation rates are annually provided by NSHE; the system is in the process of changing the remediation structure into a corequisite support model, where students take simultaneous support classes alongside college classes.

The NSHE remediation dashboard has been redesigned, which creates consistency issues in reporting metrics, but some data on remediation for the Class of 2020 year was provided: 27% of CCSD students attending College of Southern Nevada took remedial coursework, 39% attending UNLV needed remedial coursework, and 31% of UNR students needed remedial coursework. It was noted that the Class of 2020 was particularly challenging for students transitioning from high school into college due to the pandemic.

Successes include increasing access to dual enrollment programs, implementing professional learning for counselors, and tailoring individualized professional learning for AP teachers. Challenges include continuing to focus to ensure all students have access to rigorous coursework.

A revised theory of action was presented, given new approaches to remediation: “If we monitor deliberate systems at all grade levels for course enrollment in CCSD, college remediation instances will decrease.” Next steps will include expansion of ad hoc reports for rigorous course enrollment and professional learning for administrators and counselors, and monitoring student enrollment and identifying gaps in rigorous coursework.

Explore the presentation.

Trustees Approved a Notice of Intent to Amend CCSD Policy 5127: High School Graduation Requirements (7-0)

Trustees discussed and approved a Notice of Intent to amend CCSD Policy 5127 regarding high school graduation requirements. The proposed changes include adding language regarding College and Career Readiness Diplomas and updating language on curriculum, diploma, and testing requirements.

This item may be submitted for public hearing and possible approval at the Thursday, July 14, Board of Trustees meeting.

Explore the Notice of Intent and proposed changes.

Trustees Approved a Notice of Intent to Amend CCSD Regulation 5127: High School Graduation Requirements (6-1)

Trustees discussed and approved a Notice of Intent to amend CCSD Regulation 5127 regarding high school graduation requirements. The proposed changes include updating language on diploma types and including dual enrollment weights on GPA, external credit options, and a cap on weighted GPA calculations. Additionally, the Advanced Honors diploma will continue to be an option for students through the Cohort of 2025.

This item may be submitted for public hearing and possible approval at the Thursday, July 14, Board of Trustees meeting.

Explore the Notice of Intent and proposed changes.

Trustees Approved a Notice of Intent to Amend CCSD Regulation 6174: Dual Enrollment Programs (7-0)

Trustees discussed and approved a Notice of Intent to amend CCSD Regulation 6174 regarding dual enrollment. The proposed changes include language clarifying dual enrollment procedures and how credits are granted.

This item may be submitted for public hearing and possible approval at the Thursday, July 14, Board of Trustees meeting.

Explore the Notice of Intent and proposed changes.

Trustees Held a Public Hearing on and Approved New Memoranda of Agreements Regarding the Negotiated Agreements between CCSD and the Clark County Education Association, Education Support Employees Association, Clark County Association of School Administrators and Professional-Technical Employees, Police Officers Association, and the Police Administrators Association (4-1-2)

Trustees conducted a public hearing on and approved various new Memoranda of Agreements between CCSD and several Unions regarding retention bonuses, increases in teacher starting salaries, changes to the sick leave pool and professional growth system, elimination of the spring surplus, additional amounts to be paid to health savings plans, and suspending Article 18-9, in which a buyout is performed for teachers/employees who have reached 29 years of service and have at least 100 sick days; that suspension will be in effect from 2023-2025. The total fiscal impact of these agreements is up to $167,315,000.

One Trustee abstained from the vote on this item.

Explore the fiscal impact assessments summary and the Memoranda of Agreements.

Explore written public comment submitted on this agenda item.

Public Comment #2 on Non-Agenda Items

Members of the public shared comments on this item regarding: 

  • Teachers Health Trust
  • Trustee behavior
  • Possible retaliatory efforts towards employees
  • Inadequate school facilities for extreme heat conditions
  • Student and faculty safety and security issues
  • School health clinics
  • Temporary employee bonuses
  • Teacher pay and retention

The next Meeting of the Board of Trustees is scheduled for June 23, 2022, at 5:00 p.m. 

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Nevada Ed-Watch 06/02/22

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on decisions being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Nevada State Board of Education

What is the State Board of Education & what are they responsible for? The Nevada State Board of Education adopts regulations based on Nevada laws, which are passed down to individual school districts in Nevada to implement. The Board has 11 total (7 appointed and 4 publicly elected) members.

How often does the State Board meet? The Nevada State Board of Education meets once per month on Thursdays at 9:00 AM or 2:00 PM. Click here to see the 2022 Board Meeting Schedule. Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar.

Can community members engage at State Board Meetings? A time for public comment is provided at the beginning (for agenda items) and at the conclusion (on any matter) of each Board meeting. Members of the public may provide public comment in writing via email; public comment will be accepted via email for the duration of the meeting and shared with the State Board of Education during the public comment periods. Public comment may be emailed to NVBoardED@doe.nv.gov.

Click here for a list of all State Board Members.


Thursday, June 2, 2022

Nevada State Board of Education Meeting

Click here to see the regular SBOE meeting agenda.

Click here to watch the meeting playback.

What happened at the regular meeting?

Public Comment #1

Public comment was heard on the following subjects: 

  • Teacher recruitment and housing
  • Education quality in Nevada
  • AB 469 and district reorganization
  • SPCSA board appointments
  • Standardized testing, assessments, and student outcomes
  • College and career readiness

President’s Report

Highlights included:

  • There are two U.S. Presidential Scholars representing Nevada in 2022: Jang Gun Choe, from Clark High School in Las Vegas, and Julianna Schneider, from Davidson Academy in Reno.
  • There will be a presentation from the Commission on School Funding at the July Board meeting.

Superintendent’s Report

Highlights included:

  • UNR President Sandoval hosted K-12 superintendents in May for a meeting to discuss Pre-K – higher education and the educator pipeline. Also in attendance were UNLV and Nevada State College.
  • The Teacher Recruitment and Retention Advisory Task Force is a public body appointed by the Legislative Committee on Education, consisting of 20 Nevada teachers tasked with identifying challenges with and making recommendations to the Legislative Committee on Education regarding teacher recruitment and retention. There will be a presentation and report given next week to the Legislative Committee on Education.
  • The Nevada Department of Education provides data and information to the Joint Interim Legislative Committee on Education, including six recent presentations (and five scheduled for the upcoming meeting) on a variety of topics, including regarding health and wellness, retention, restorative practice, school safety, performance plans, and boards, councils, and commissions.

Board Approved Consent Agenda 

Consent agenda items included:

Board Appointed Dr. Tonia Holmes-Sutton to Serve as a State Board Appointee to the State Public Charter School Authority Board

The Board reviewed eight applications to serve as one of two State Board appointees for a three-year term on the State Public Charter School Authority Board (July 1, 2022- June 30, 2025). After applicant interviews and board discussion, Dr. Tonia Holmes-Sutton was selected to serve a second term on the SPCSA board.

Review the applicants’ information here.

Board Delayed a Presentation and Vote on the College and Career Ready High School Assessment RFP Process

The Board delayed the presentation and vote on the agenda item regarding the College and Career Ready (CCR) High School Assessment RFP Process and the resulting recommendation of the RFP Selection Committee. The item will now be heard at the July Board of Education meeting.

Explore the presentation and the Request for Proposal.

Future Agenda Items

Suggestions for future agenda items regarding legislative priorities and the Commission on School Funding, the progress on carryover dollars as related to AB 469, and workforce development updates were discussed.

Public Comment #2

Public comment was heard on the following subject:

  • AB 469 Subcommittee behavior

The next Board of Education meeting is scheduled at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 7, 2022.


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Nevada Ed-Watch: 4/21/22

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on decisions being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Nevada State Board of Education

What is the State Board of Education & what are they responsible for? The Nevada State Board of Education adopts regulations based on Nevada laws, which are passed down to individual school districts in Nevada to implement. The Board has 11 total (7 appointed and 4 publicly elected) members.

How often does the State Board meet? The Nevada State Board of Education meets once per month on Thursdays at 9:00 AM or 2:00 PM. Click here to see the 2022 Board Meeting Schedule. Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar.

Can community members engage at State Board Meetings? A time for public comment is provided at the beginning (for agenda items) and at the conclusion (on any matter) of each Board meeting. Members of the public may provide public comment in writing via email; public comment will be accepted via email for the duration of the meeting and shared with the State Board of Education during the public comment periods. Public comment may be emailed to NVBoardED@doe.nv.gov.

Click here for a list of all State Board Members.


Thursday, April 21, 2022

Nevada State Board of Education Meeting

Click here to see the regular SBOE meeting agenda.

Click here to watch the meeting playback.

What happened at the regular meeting?

Public Comment #1

Public comment was heard on the following subjects: 

  • Teacher and support staff recruitment, retention, and pay
  • The impact of AB 469 on teachers, support staff, and current employment agreements
  • AB 469 definitions

President’s Report

Highlights included:

  • The Washoe County School Board is in the final process of selecting its next Superintendent of Public Schools, and the new superintendent will be announced next week.
  • Student safety concerns and the importance of providing resources for students who are experiencing stress, trauma, and mental health issues were also highlighted.

Superintendent’s Report

Highlights included:

  • Safety, Mental, and Behavioral Needs of Nevada Students and Educators Roundtables were held. Discussions included protections for employees and students, misconceptions regarding restorative justice, and student discipline measures related to safety issues.
  • Twenty-five teams competed in the FIRST Robotics Competition at the Thomas & Mack Center, in a statewide competition. Some students are participating in the national competition in Texas.
  • SPCSA appointment applications are due in by May 13 and can be found here.

Board Approved Consent Agenda 

Consent agenda items included:

Board Heard an Update on Ratios of Specialized Instructional Support Personnel

The Board heard an update on ratios of Specialized Instructional Support Personnel (SISP) and the implementation of requirements in Senate Bill (SB) 89 (2019), SB 151 (2021), and SB 352 (2021). The presentation explained the update to the ratios (SB 89 and 151) and some of the strategies and policies to help increase the number of support personnel in schools.

Clark County and Washoe County are required to create reports on these ratios, and baseline ratios were reported from the 2019 and 2020 school years. There is still work to be done to reach these ratios within these school districts across the board, with a decline in social workers and an uptick in school noted by staff.

Efforts to improve SISP ratios include differing revenue streams to support hiring and developing these positions. Staff are also looking at more diversified revenue streams to fund these positions.

Explore the presentation, which includes baseline numbers, ratios, and reporting.

Board Approved Teach Nevada Scholarship Awards

The Board received a presentation on current available funds for Teach Nevada scholarship awards and requests. Available funds for 2023 allocations are $2.4 million. They are proposing two award phases in the fiscal year to allow for better planning and scholarship distribution. 2022 carryover funds, as well as rebalanced funds, will be requested in the fall. Two options were presented for awards during this meeting, and board approved the second option.

Explore the presentation.

Board Heard an Update on Educator Recruitment Needs and Efforts

The Board received presentations from Data Insight Partners and EdLiFE on educator retention and attrition, national education workforce trends, and statewide efforts on educator recruitment and retention.

Data Insight Partners presented on educator retention and attrition and workforce trends. It is estimated that 3,000 more teachers are needed in Nevada, based on recommended class sizes. Comparing Nevada’s student-teacher ratios with national averages, this is a conservative estimate, as approximately 9 in 10 students are in a larger-than-recommended class size.

In the last two years, staff separations have accelerated later in the school year (April – July). Teachers this year are leaving at a faster pace earlier in the school year, with 1,156 teacher/licensed staff separations between August and March of this school year (comparatively, in 2020-21, there were 824 separations, and in 2019-20, there were 781 separations). Teacher recruitment nationwide is expected to be competitive.

The work ahead identified is understanding trends, pipeline, and obstacles moving forward; building the data infrastructure; monitoring access to experienced teachers; and improving the ability to predict future demand.

EdLiFE staff presented on efforts underway to expand and increase the diversity of Nevada’s education workforce, recruitment, and retention efforts.

Explore the Data Insight Partners presentation and the EdLiFE presentation.

Board Received an Update on Implementation of AB 469, and Approved Items for Regulation Workshops

The Board received a presentation on national non-compliance policies and practices related to state takeovers, possible non-compliance regulatory language, and revisions of other language as mandated by AB 469, as brought forth from the AB 469 Subcommittee.

Four possible NAC 388G draft regulation changes were discussed:

  1. Possible regulatory language changes regarding the non-compliance policy for large school districts, including the appointment of a compliance monitor. Additional language changes include the monitor having the requisite skills that align to the deficiencies of the district, conditions of the receivership, and the resources and compensation of the monitor.
  2. Possible regulatory language changes on dispute resolution processes
  3. Proposed changes to language that specifically outline the school district’s responsibility to mandatory training on provisions of NRS 388G.500-388G.810.
  4. Additional clarity on defining staff that is evaluated by the principal or principal’s staff as included in Subsection 2 of NRS 388G.610.

After discussion, the proposed language on non-compliance policy/consequences (with changes), dispute resolution revision, training language, and the definition of “other staff under the direct supervision of the principal” were approved to move forward.

The next steps will be to have these proposed regulations go to regulation workshops, and then be presented back to the Board for a formal hearing. Upon approval, these changes would be sent to the Legislative Commission for final review and adoption.

Explore the proposed language and presentation.

Future Agenda Items

Suggestions for future agenda items regarding mental health and student safety were discussed.

Public Comment #2

Public comment was heard on the following subjects:

  • Support staff development and certificate programs
  • Student and staff safety
  • Bus driver professional pathways


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