Nevada Ed-Watch 06/02/22

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on decisions being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Nevada State Board of Education

What is the State Board of Education & what are they responsible for? The Nevada State Board of Education adopts regulations based on Nevada laws, which are passed down to individual school districts in Nevada to implement. The Board has 11 total (7 appointed and 4 publicly elected) members.

How often does the State Board meet? The Nevada State Board of Education meets once per month on Thursdays at 9:00 AM or 2:00 PM. Click here to see the 2022 Board Meeting Schedule. Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar.

Can community members engage at State Board Meetings? A time for public comment is provided at the beginning (for agenda items) and at the conclusion (on any matter) of each Board meeting. Members of the public may provide public comment in writing via email; public comment will be accepted via email for the duration of the meeting and shared with the State Board of Education during the public comment periods. Public comment may be emailed to NVBoardED@doe.nv.gov.

Click here for a list of all State Board Members.


Thursday, June 2, 2022

Nevada State Board of Education Meeting

Click here to see the regular SBOE meeting agenda.

Click here to watch the meeting playback.

What happened at the regular meeting?

Public Comment #1

Public comment was heard on the following subjects: 

  • Teacher recruitment and housing
  • Education quality in Nevada
  • AB 469 and district reorganization
  • SPCSA board appointments
  • Standardized testing, assessments, and student outcomes
  • College and career readiness

President’s Report

Highlights included:

  • There are two U.S. Presidential Scholars representing Nevada in 2022: Jang Gun Choe, from Clark High School in Las Vegas, and Julianna Schneider, from Davidson Academy in Reno.
  • There will be a presentation from the Commission on School Funding at the July Board meeting.

Superintendent’s Report

Highlights included:

  • UNR President Sandoval hosted K-12 superintendents in May for a meeting to discuss Pre-K – higher education and the educator pipeline. Also in attendance were UNLV and Nevada State College.
  • The Teacher Recruitment and Retention Advisory Task Force is a public body appointed by the Legislative Committee on Education, consisting of 20 Nevada teachers tasked with identifying challenges with and making recommendations to the Legislative Committee on Education regarding teacher recruitment and retention. There will be a presentation and report given next week to the Legislative Committee on Education.
  • The Nevada Department of Education provides data and information to the Joint Interim Legislative Committee on Education, including six recent presentations (and five scheduled for the upcoming meeting) on a variety of topics, including regarding health and wellness, retention, restorative practice, school safety, performance plans, and boards, councils, and commissions.

Board Approved Consent Agenda 

Consent agenda items included:

Board Appointed Dr. Tonia Holmes-Sutton to Serve as a State Board Appointee to the State Public Charter School Authority Board

The Board reviewed eight applications to serve as one of two State Board appointees for a three-year term on the State Public Charter School Authority Board (July 1, 2022- June 30, 2025). After applicant interviews and board discussion, Dr. Tonia Holmes-Sutton was selected to serve a second term on the SPCSA board.

Review the applicants’ information here.

Board Delayed a Presentation and Vote on the College and Career Ready High School Assessment RFP Process

The Board delayed the presentation and vote on the agenda item regarding the College and Career Ready (CCR) High School Assessment RFP Process and the resulting recommendation of the RFP Selection Committee. The item will now be heard at the July Board of Education meeting.

Explore the presentation and the Request for Proposal.

Future Agenda Items

Suggestions for future agenda items regarding legislative priorities and the Commission on School Funding, the progress on carryover dollars as related to AB 469, and workforce development updates were discussed.

Public Comment #2

Public comment was heard on the following subject:

  • AB 469 Subcommittee behavior

The next Board of Education meeting is scheduled at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 7, 2022.


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Nevada Ed-Watch: 4/21/22

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on decisions being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Nevada State Board of Education

What is the State Board of Education & what are they responsible for? The Nevada State Board of Education adopts regulations based on Nevada laws, which are passed down to individual school districts in Nevada to implement. The Board has 11 total (7 appointed and 4 publicly elected) members.

How often does the State Board meet? The Nevada State Board of Education meets once per month on Thursdays at 9:00 AM or 2:00 PM. Click here to see the 2022 Board Meeting Schedule. Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar.

Can community members engage at State Board Meetings? A time for public comment is provided at the beginning (for agenda items) and at the conclusion (on any matter) of each Board meeting. Members of the public may provide public comment in writing via email; public comment will be accepted via email for the duration of the meeting and shared with the State Board of Education during the public comment periods. Public comment may be emailed to NVBoardED@doe.nv.gov.

Click here for a list of all State Board Members.


Thursday, April 21, 2022

Nevada State Board of Education Meeting

Click here to see the regular SBOE meeting agenda.

Click here to watch the meeting playback.

What happened at the regular meeting?

Public Comment #1

Public comment was heard on the following subjects: 

  • Teacher and support staff recruitment, retention, and pay
  • The impact of AB 469 on teachers, support staff, and current employment agreements
  • AB 469 definitions

President’s Report

Highlights included:

  • The Washoe County School Board is in the final process of selecting its next Superintendent of Public Schools, and the new superintendent will be announced next week.
  • Student safety concerns and the importance of providing resources for students who are experiencing stress, trauma, and mental health issues were also highlighted.

Superintendent’s Report

Highlights included:

  • Safety, Mental, and Behavioral Needs of Nevada Students and Educators Roundtables were held. Discussions included protections for employees and students, misconceptions regarding restorative justice, and student discipline measures related to safety issues.
  • Twenty-five teams competed in the FIRST Robotics Competition at the Thomas & Mack Center, in a statewide competition. Some students are participating in the national competition in Texas.
  • SPCSA appointment applications are due in by May 13 and can be found here.

Board Approved Consent Agenda 

Consent agenda items included:

Board Heard an Update on Ratios of Specialized Instructional Support Personnel

The Board heard an update on ratios of Specialized Instructional Support Personnel (SISP) and the implementation of requirements in Senate Bill (SB) 89 (2019), SB 151 (2021), and SB 352 (2021). The presentation explained the update to the ratios (SB 89 and 151) and some of the strategies and policies to help increase the number of support personnel in schools.

Clark County and Washoe County are required to create reports on these ratios, and baseline ratios were reported from the 2019 and 2020 school years. There is still work to be done to reach these ratios within these school districts across the board, with a decline in social workers and an uptick in school noted by staff.

Efforts to improve SISP ratios include differing revenue streams to support hiring and developing these positions. Staff are also looking at more diversified revenue streams to fund these positions.

Explore the presentation, which includes baseline numbers, ratios, and reporting.

Board Approved Teach Nevada Scholarship Awards

The Board received a presentation on current available funds for Teach Nevada scholarship awards and requests. Available funds for 2023 allocations are $2.4 million. They are proposing two award phases in the fiscal year to allow for better planning and scholarship distribution. 2022 carryover funds, as well as rebalanced funds, will be requested in the fall. Two options were presented for awards during this meeting, and board approved the second option.

Explore the presentation.

Board Heard an Update on Educator Recruitment Needs and Efforts

The Board received presentations from Data Insight Partners and EdLiFE on educator retention and attrition, national education workforce trends, and statewide efforts on educator recruitment and retention.

Data Insight Partners presented on educator retention and attrition and workforce trends. It is estimated that 3,000 more teachers are needed in Nevada, based on recommended class sizes. Comparing Nevada’s student-teacher ratios with national averages, this is a conservative estimate, as approximately 9 in 10 students are in a larger-than-recommended class size.

In the last two years, staff separations have accelerated later in the school year (April – July). Teachers this year are leaving at a faster pace earlier in the school year, with 1,156 teacher/licensed staff separations between August and March of this school year (comparatively, in 2020-21, there were 824 separations, and in 2019-20, there were 781 separations). Teacher recruitment nationwide is expected to be competitive.

The work ahead identified is understanding trends, pipeline, and obstacles moving forward; building the data infrastructure; monitoring access to experienced teachers; and improving the ability to predict future demand.

EdLiFE staff presented on efforts underway to expand and increase the diversity of Nevada’s education workforce, recruitment, and retention efforts.

Explore the Data Insight Partners presentation and the EdLiFE presentation.

Board Received an Update on Implementation of AB 469, and Approved Items for Regulation Workshops

The Board received a presentation on national non-compliance policies and practices related to state takeovers, possible non-compliance regulatory language, and revisions of other language as mandated by AB 469, as brought forth from the AB 469 Subcommittee.

Four possible NAC 388G draft regulation changes were discussed:

  1. Possible regulatory language changes regarding the non-compliance policy for large school districts, including the appointment of a compliance monitor. Additional language changes include the monitor having the requisite skills that align to the deficiencies of the district, conditions of the receivership, and the resources and compensation of the monitor.
  2. Possible regulatory language changes on dispute resolution processes
  3. Proposed changes to language that specifically outline the school district’s responsibility to mandatory training on provisions of NRS 388G.500-388G.810.
  4. Additional clarity on defining staff that is evaluated by the principal or principal’s staff as included in Subsection 2 of NRS 388G.610.

After discussion, the proposed language on non-compliance policy/consequences (with changes), dispute resolution revision, training language, and the definition of “other staff under the direct supervision of the principal” were approved to move forward.

The next steps will be to have these proposed regulations go to regulation workshops, and then be presented back to the Board for a formal hearing. Upon approval, these changes would be sent to the Legislative Commission for final review and adoption.

Explore the proposed language and presentation.

Future Agenda Items

Suggestions for future agenda items regarding mental health and student safety were discussed.

Public Comment #2

Public comment was heard on the following subjects:

  • Support staff development and certificate programs
  • Student and staff safety
  • Bus driver professional pathways


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Nevada Ed-Watch: 03/17/2022

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on decisions being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Nevada State Board of Education

What is the State Board of Education & what are they responsible for? The Nevada State Board of Education adopts regulations based on Nevada laws, which are passed down to individual school districts in Nevada to implement. The Board has 11 total (7 appointed and 4 publicly elected) members.

How often does the State Board meet? The Nevada State Board of Education meets once per month on Thursdays at 9:00 AM or 2:00 PM. Click here to see the 2022 Board Meeting Schedule. Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar.

Can community members engage at State Board Meetings? A time for public comment is provided at the beginning (for agenda items) and at the conclusion (on any matter) of each Board meeting. Members of the public may provide public comment in writing via email; public comment will be accepted via email for the duration of the meeting and shared with the State Board of Education during the public comment periods. Public comment may be emailed to NVBoardED@doe.nv.gov.

Click here for a list of all State Board Members.


Thursday, March 17, 2022

Nevada State Board of Education Meeting

Click here to see the regular SBOE meeting agenda.

Click here to watch the meeting playback.

What happened at the regular meeting?

Public Comment #1

Public comment was heard on the following subjects: 

  • Dispute resolution language in NRS 388G
  • Implementation of AB 469
  • Regulatory language and other provisions in AB 469

President’s Report

Highlights included:

  • There is an opening on the State Public Charter School Authority Board. This is a three-year appointment that begins July 1, 2022 and concludes June 30, 2025. The application can be found here. Applications close on May 13, 2022.
  • Nevada Reading Week was held February 28 – March 4, 2022, with the goal to inspire a love of reading statewide. Twelve diverse authors also took part in a reading event, reaching about 24,000 students statewide.
  • The Board participated in Silver State Governance Training to ensure that the Board’s goals are aligned with the vision for the state. Additional discussion on this topic will be provided later in the meeting.

Superintendent’s Report

Highlights included:

  • U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona visited Clark County, discussing school and student needs, resource allocation on a federal level, and other topics.

Board Approved Consent Agenda 

Consent agenda items included:

Board Heard an Update Regarding Revisions to Proposed Definitions and Regulatory Language from the AB 469 Subcommittee

The Board reviewed possible revisions to NAC 388G, from discussions heard during the February 23, 2022 AB 469 subcommittee meeting. Proposed changes include defining terms within the proposed regulations in Section 1, and reviewing placement and hiring aspects for local precincts in Sections 2 and 3.

Board members discussed substitute teacher hiring and reporting requirements. The Board approved the proposed language as drafted and will be moving forward with the workshop and hearing process.

Explore the updates here.  

Board Heard an Update on State Board of Education Interim Goals in Accordance with Silver State Governance Training

The Board received a presentation on interim goals to align with the State Board of Education’s two long-term goals, which include measures for annual progress that follow the framework of Silver State Governance.

The first State Board of Education goal is to move up in State rankings from 18th in September 2020 to Top 10 by July 2026, as measured by academic portions of Quality Counts K-12 Student Achievement Index. The interim goals for success include closing pre-K-8 opportunity gaps, reducing graduation rate opportunity gaps, increasing participation in college-level and career and technical education (CTE) coursework, and enhancing support for English Learners (ELs).

The second goal is to increase the overall number of students receiving the College and Career Ready (CCR) diploma from 23.9% in July 2021 to 50% by July 2026 and eliminate gaps of student groups while raising the overall average. Interim goals to achieve this will be increasing access to STEM learning, increasing participation in college-level and CTE coursework, expanding access to CTE for all students (including free and asynchronous learning opportunities), and increasing college enrollment.  

Explore the working copy of the goals and benchmarks here.

Explore the possible guardrails here.

Future Agenda Items

Future agenda items may include moving the Board meeting time and increasing accessibility to Board meetings, receiving an informational briefing and discussion on CCR diplomas, and receiving an informational briefing on the Community College Workforce Development Board.

Public Comment #2

Public comment was heard on the following subjects:

  • Access to the ACT in languages other than English
  • Reorganization of large school districts
  • State rankings for academic achievement reporting
  • Community engagement
  • AB 469 transparency and proposed regulations
  • Violent incidents involving students and employees


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Nevada Ed-Watch 1/20/2022

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on decisions being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Nevada State Board of Education

What is the State Board of Education & what are they responsible for? The Nevada State Board of Education adopts regulations based on Nevada laws, which are passed down to individual school districts in Nevada to implement. The Board has 11 total (7 appointed and 4 publicly elected) members.

How often does the State Board meet? The Nevada State Board of Education meets once per month on Thursdays at 9:00 AM or 2:00 PM. Click here to see the 2022 Board Meeting Schedule. Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar.

Can community members engage at State Board Meetings? A time for public comment is provided at the beginning (for agenda items) and at the conclusion (on any matter) of each Board meeting. Members of the public may provide public comment in writing via email; public comment will be accepted via email for the duration of the meeting and shared with the State Board of Education during the public comment periods. Public comment may be emailed to NVBoardED@doe.nv.gov.

Click here for a list of all State Board Members.


Thursday, January 20, 2022

Nevada State Board of Education Meeting

Click here to see the regular SBOE meeting agenda.

Click here to watch the meeting playback.

What happened at the regular meeting?

Public Comment #1

Written public comment was read into the record by staff regarding: 

  • The need to ensure AB469 is being upheld.
  • The willingness of the CCSD Board of Trustees Officers to work directly with the State Board of Education to ensure compliance with AB469. 

Superintendent’s Report

  • Pupil-Centered Funding Plan Update:
    • The Commission on School Funding has affirmed their support of the definition for “at-risk” weighted funding category and is currently reviewing the cost of education index. 
  • Overview of Teacher Recruitment & Retention programs funded by federal relief funding:
    • Nevada received approximately $1.5 billion in federal relief funding for K-12 education. 10% of the funds are reserved for the The Nevada Department of Education to run statewide programs. Four priority areas were identified for the use of those funds: Advancing Equity, Teacher Recruitment and Retention, Social-Emotional Learning & Mental Health, and Efficiencies for Long-Term Success. Board members received an update on Teacher Recruitment and Retention program including: 
      • Incentivizing Pathways to Teaching – $20.7 million
      • DonorsChoose Grant Program $8 million
      • Nevada Educator Preparation Institute and Collaborative (NV-EPIC) $6.1 million
      • Nevada Educator Preparation Institute and Collaborative (NV-EPIC) $2.9 million
      • Teaching and Training CTE Rural and Urban Expansion and Support $2.3 million
      • Statewide Leadership Networks $3.2 million

Click here to view the Teacher Recruitment and Retention Focus Area Overview. 

Board Approved Consent Agenda 

Board Heard Update on Nevada 2020-21 Graduation Rates

In 2021, 30,479 students graduated, bringing the state’s 4-year adjusted cohort graduation rate to 81%, down from 82.5% in 2020 and 84.1% in 2019. The largest graduation rate gap among race/ethnic groups statewide was between Asain students at 92.3% and Black students at 70.3%. Among students part of special populations, students who are in foster care had the lowest 2021 graduation rate at 43.3%. 

The majority of students continue to graduate with a Standard Diploma (57.6%) with 18.2% earning an Advanced Diploma and 23.3% earning a College and Career Readiness Diploma. Board members discussed the importance of prioritizing college and career readiness diplomas as the default for students, rather than the Standard diploma, in order to continue progressing towards the Department of Education’s goal of increasing the number of students who are considered college and career ready upon graduation.

Click here to view the full presentation. 

Board Heard Presentation on Nevada Commission on Mentoring 

Board members received an update on mentoring initiatives from Karl Catarata, Chairman of the Nevada Commission on Mentoring.  The purpose of the commission is to support, facilitate and coordinate mentoring programs in Nevada. The commission has established three priorities: ​​1) Establishing a National Mentoring Affiliate 2) Providing capacity-building grants to local mentoring organizations in Nevada through return of funding, and 3) Statewide Annual Conference on Mentoring.

Click here to view the presentation. 

Board Heard Update from AB469 Subcommittee

Board members heard a presentation from the AB469 Subcommittee regarding the Subcommittee’s progress on the implementation of Assembly Bill (AB) 469 from the 2017 Legislative Session. The purpose of the subcommittee is to create guardrails and definitions that clarify the intention of the law for principals who intend to fill staff positions with substitutes.  Board members heard an update on the development of definitions for the terms “the greatest extent possible” and “in good standing” as related to principles to staffing. Board members discussed the need to further define “to the greatest extent possible” to include more explicit guidelines.  

  • in good standing 
    • The employee has the appropriate license for the open position 
    • Their previous evaluation is positive
    • Not actively engaged in disciplinary proceedings 
    • Good attendance 
  • to the greatest extent possible 
    • The principal has the ability to see all eligible candidates
    • The principal has made every effort to hire a candidate 
    • The district must develop procedures for principles to ensure compliance with “to the greatest extent possible” 
    • The district cannot place an employee without the consent of the principal 

The subcommittee also provided examples of potential consequences for noncompliance with the law including district financial oversight, monitoring of the superintendent and/or monitoring of the board of trustees, receivership of the district, and suspension or removal of the superintendent or board of trustees.  Based on feedback from the board, the subcommittee will re-review their recommendations and bring them back to the board for final approval. Upon formal acceptance of the recommendations by the board, they will be submitted to the Nevada Legislature.

Click here to view the presentation. 

Board Heard Update on Progress of the State Plan for the Improvement of Pupils (STIP)

Each year, the department updates the State Plan for the Improvement of Pupils (STIP) aligned to needed improvements in student outcomes. NDE staff provided the board with an update on two goals: 

  • Move up in State rankings from 18th in September 2020 to Top 10 by July 2026 in K-12 Student Achievement, as measured by Quality Counts.
    • Update: Nevada maintained its standing at 18th as of September 2021. 
  • Increase the overall number of students receiving the College and Career Ready (CCR) diploma from 23.9% in July 2021 to 50% by July 2026 and eliminate gaps of student groups while raising the overall average.
    • Update: In comparing students receiving CCR diplomas, Nevada saw an 0.6% decrease between the graduating classes of 2020 and 2021.

Click here to view the full presentation.


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Nevada Ed-Watch 11/4/2021

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on decisions being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Nevada State Board of Education

What is the State Board of Education & what are they responsible for? The Nevada State Board of Education adopts regulations based on Nevada laws, which are passed down to individual school districts in Nevada to implement. The Board has 11 total (7 appointed and 4 publicly elected) members.

How often does the State Board meet? The Nevada State Board of Education meets once per month on Thursdays at 9:00 AM or 2:00 PM. Click here to see the 2021 Board Meeting Schedule. Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar.

Can community members engage at State Board Meetings? A time for public comment is provided at the beginning (for agenda items) and at the conclusion (on any matter) of each Board meeting. Members of the public may provide public comment in writing via email; public comment will be accepted via email for the duration of the meeting and shared with the State Board of Education during the public comment periods. Public comment may be emailed to NVBoardED@doe.nv.gov.

Click here for a list of all State Board Members.


Thursday, November 4, 2021

Nevada State Board of Education Meeting

Click here to see the regular SBOE meeting agenda.

Click here to watch the meeting playback.

What happened at the regular meeting?

Public Comment #1

Members of the public provided comment on agenda items regarding:

  • Concerns that school districts are not able to meet the needs of students, including shortages of bus drivers, substitutes, and staff.
  • Factors pushing teachers out of teaching not being addressed.
  • The aggregated nature of NEPF score reports and the need for more individualized assessment.
  • Whether the NEPF is an effective assessment tool and effectively helps to support teachers in ensuring student academic success.
  • Appreciation for the joint SBOE and CCSD meeting held on 9-30-2021.
  • Concerns about low proficiency scores amongst high school students yet high graduation rates and whether students are effectively being prepared for college and career.
  • Recognition of the leadership and service of Nevada’s 2021 and 2022 Teachers of the Year, Juliana Urtubey and Deanne Hicks, respectively.

President’s Report

  • Assembly Bill 469 Update
    • On September 30, 2021, the SBOE held a joint meeting with the CCSD Board of Trustees with the goal of ensuring that trustees understood AB 469 and what the law entails.
    • The next meeting of the AB 469 Subcommittee of the Board is scheduled for December 14, 2021, at 3:00 pm.
  • State ARP ESSER Plan
    • In September, Superintendent Ebert announced that the Department of Ed has approved the Nevada state plan for us of the ESSER relief funds. The plan was informed by an extensive stakeholder engagement process, including listening sessions and a 30-day comment period, with the goal of increasing transparency and community engagement.
    • Nevada received total relief funding of over 1 billion dollars. As funds are implemented, materials will be developed for the public highlighting how the Nevada Department of Education (NV DOE) is spending its 10% allocation of those funds.
    • The state will be translating more of its materials and documentation so that it is consumable for families. Moving forward, more materials will be available in three languages: English, Spanish, and Tagalog.
    • Money will be invested in systems to help SBOE with better reporting and analysis of data to deliver actionable data to school districts, schools, and community stakeholders.

Superintendent’s Report

  • ARP ESSER Funding
    • 10% of ARP ESSER funding is allocated at the state level and 90% at the local level. Part of that 10% is allocated to the DonorsChoose program through which almost 8,000 projects have been submitted by educators. The program allows educators closest to the work to make the determination on how to spend those funds. Educators from 650 schools have participated.
    • $20 million is set aside to assist future educators through the educator pipeline. Over 700 future educators are taking advantage of the opportunity. The dollars will also be allocated toward building a dashboard to show where the dollars are being spent.
    • The remaining funds will be allocated to four buckers of work programs which include Teaching Recruitment & Retention, Advancing Equity, Social-Emotional Learning & Mental Health, and Efficiencies for Long-Term Success.

Board Heard Information and Discussion Regarding Statewide School Climate Results

NRS 385A.650 requires school principals to submit a plan to improve the achievement of pupils, including “methods for evaluating and improving the school climate”. The Nevada School Climate/Social Emotional Learning Survey (NV-SCSEL) helps to identify the needs of schools along the school climate in order to place social workers and funds in schools with the highest needs.

The NV-SCSEL Student Survey is offered in English and Spanish and includes 49 questions and a handful of demographic questions, all optional, geared toward students in grades 5–12. The Student Survey measures students’ perceptions of their school across four school climate constructs:

  • Engagement
    • Cultural and Linguistic Competence of instructional materials and educational personnel
    • Relationships between pupils and the parents or legal guardians of pupils and educational personnel
  • Safety  of pupils and educational personnel
    • Emotional Safety
    • Physical Safety

The Student Survey also measures students’ perceptions of themselves on a Social-Emotional Competency construct:

  • Social, Emotional, and Academic development of pupils and educational personnel

Due to COVID-19 impacts, participation rates dropped significantly, raising the potential impact of selection bias on survey results. The results of school climate surveys are expected to return to results more in line with previous school years for the 2021-22 school year.

Members of the board shared questions regarding whether the large increase in physical safety results is due to more students staying at home during distance learning, how to help students with emotional safety and encourage the use of related available resources for schools, how the data is used for continual improvement, and the potential to better disaggregate student race and ethnicity in survey results related to root cause data.

Click here to view the presentation including statewide results for all constructs.

Board Approved Cut Scores for Nevada Educator Performance Framework (NEPF)

The Board heard a presentation regarding the 2020-21 NEPF summative data as well as cut score range recommendations from the Teachers and Leaders Council to be voted on by the board. The Nevada Educator Performance Framework (NEPF) is designed as a professional growth tool to help educators improve their practice so that all students have access to effective educators. The evaluation cycle is designed to provide educators with ongoing constructive feedback to improve their practice and to help schools and districts provide meaningful professional growth and ultimately increase student achievement.

NEFP Teacher Ratings Trend Data:


Image Source: Nevada Dept. of Education

Members of the board along with presenters discussed challenges with the NEPF, including that it was not designed to be summative and that it would be challenging to change the NEPF from a focus on teacher action to an orientation toward impact on student achievement. Trustees and presenters also discussed the need for a focus on shifting culture and facilitating multiple and shorter educator observations to include evidence-driven reflective conversations that lead to continuous improvement. Further discussion included whether changing cut stores would cause more confusion and the need for clarity and training about what is actually being scored in the NEPF for educators.

The board approved a motion to accept cut score ranges for the current school year and school years moving forward.

Click here to view the presentation including additional NEPF results.

Board Approved RFP Process for Review and Selection of a Statewide College & Career Readiness (CCR) Assessment

The College and Career Readiness (CCR) Indicator uses ACT results data. The ACT is given to students in Grade 11. Previously, the ACT assessed for English and Math but was not rigorous enough for Science. Trustees and presenters discussed the advantages of a single assessment to test in English, Math, and Science including reductions in the number of tests required, the amount of time to take assessments, cost, and time away from the classroom. The Board would like vendors to address and/or include at minimum the following items in their RFPs:

  • Free preparatory supports, including multilingual supports.
  • Fee waivers for students that need to retake the test.
  • Alignment with Higher Ed entrance criteria.
  • Alignment with potential workforce or certification programs.
  • Alignment with Nevada standards.
  • Pre-built marketing materials/PR that ensure students understand the value of the test to their futures as opposed to the narrative that it’s a requirement for graduation.
  • A deeper understanding of the career pathway and ensuring it does not get lumped into college readiness.
  • Extensive bias testing.
  • A component for Science.
  • Predictive data about how the exam leads to post-secondary success.

Members of the board approved to move the CCR Assessment RFP process forward.

Click here to view the presentation.

Information and Discussion Regarding the 2021 and 2022 Nevada Teachers of the Year

Board members did not discuss this agenda item. Click here to view the presentation materials.

Future Agenda Items

NRS 385.040 requires that the State Board hold at least 9 but no more than 12 meetings per year and at least one of the meetings of the State Board must include a discussion with the superintendents of the school districts, presidents of the boards of trustees of the school districts, representatives of the governing bodies of charter schools, and other school and education decision-making bodies to discuss goals and benchmarks. This meeting is planned for December 2021.

Members of the board requested the following items for consideration in the December 2021 meeting agenda:

  • Re-engage in discussion around Governance goals.
  • A collaborative discussion about how SBOE is communicating their goals to school districts to ensure their goals are aligned with ours.
  • Identifying barriers to making progress as well as what is going well that can be double-downed on.
  • Getting a sense of what school districts are dealing with in the trenches and ways SBOE can help support them.

Public comment #2

Members of the public provided comment on non-agenda items regarding concerns about vaccine and mask mandates. Members of the board informed the public that vaccine mandates are not within the jurisdiction of the State Board of Education and that public comment is reserved for items within the SBOE’s jurisdiction.


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Nevada Ed-Watch 9/30/21

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on decisions being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Nevada State Board of Education

What is the State Board of Education & what are they responsible for? The Nevada State Board of Education adopts regulations based on Nevada laws, which are passed down to individual school districts in Nevada to implement. The Board has 11 total (7 appointed and 4 publicly elected) members.

How often does the State Board meet? The Nevada State Board of Education meets once per month on Thursdays at 9:00 AM or 2:00 PM. Click here to see the 2021 Board Meeting Schedule. Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar.

Can community members engage at State Board Meetings? A time for public comment is provided at the beginning (for agenda items) and at the conclusion (on any matter) of each Board meeting. Members of the public may provide public comment in writing via email; public comment will be accepted via email for the duration of the meeting and shared with the State Board of Education during the public comment periods. Public comment may be emailed to NVBoardED@doe.nv.gov.

Click here for a list of all State Board Members.


Thursday, September 30, 2021
Nevada State Board of Education Meeting & Joint Meeting with the Clark County School District Board of Trustees

Click here to see the regular SBOE meeting agenda
Click here to see the joint SBOE & CCSD meeting agenda

What happened at the regular meeting?

Public Comment

Members of the public provided comment regarding:

  • A request to reexamine the per-pupil funding formula for rural schools, specifically around extra funding, due to concerns that funds will be shortened and, as a result, programs will be cut, for rural schools
  • Concerns around how assessment result narratives are presented

President’s Report

President Ebert expressed appreciation for and congratulations to the following Nevada educators recognized as Teachers of the Year in various categories:

  • 2021 History Teacher of the Year
  • 2021 Early Educators of the Year
    • Kaitlin Farley Cortes, a Pre-Kindergarten teacher, and Avis Moore, an infant-toddler teacher, both Washoe County educators, received Nevada’s first-ever award for Early Educator of the Year.
  • 2022 Teacher of the Year
    • Deanne Moyle-Hicks, an educator at Natchez Elementary School in Washoe County School District, was named the 2022 State Teacher of the Year. The mission of the Nevada Teacher of the Year program is to celebrate excellence and strengthen the teaching force by honoring and recognizing exceptional teachers on a school, district, state, and national level. 

Superintendent’s Report

  • COVID-19 Update
    • On September 13, the U.S. Department of Education approved Nevada’s plan for ESEA 2 funds and has released the final one-third of the ARP ESSER dollars to the state.
    • Nevada has been working to maximize and expand existing funding and initiatives. The Nevada Department of Education (NDE) will be allocating $8 million in Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) funds to help K-12 public school educators. The funds will be distributed through DonorsChoose and used for classroom resources for teachers and students. This makes Nevada the first state to directly invest in educator projects on DonorsChoose.
  • Pupil-Centered Funding Plan Update
    • Guy Hobbs has been named the new Chair of the Commission on School Funding. Hobbs worked for many years directly in Clark County. The next meeting of the Commission on School Funding is October 8, 2021, at 9:00 am. NDE President Ebert requested that the community bring or submit public comment to the meeting.
  • The U.S. Department of Education has recognized three Nevada schools as National Blue Ribbon Schools for 2021:
    • Frank Lamping ES and Charlotte Hill ES in Clark County for closing the gap.
    • Charlotte Hill Elementary School, Clark County School District, for the “Exemplary Achievement Gap Closing” category
    • Frank Lamping Elementary School, Clark County School District for the “Exemplary Achievement Gap Closing” category
    • Pinecrest Academy of Nevada Inspirada, State Public Charter School Authority, for the  “Exemplary High Performing Schools” category.

Board Heard Presentation on State Assessment Results for the 2020-21 School Year

The Board heard a presentation regarding data from the statewide summative assessments that were administered during the 2020-21 school year, including Smart Balance Assessment (SBAC) and ACT results including:

  • Grade 3-8 students in English Languish Arts & Mathematics
  • ACT, 11th grade
  • English Language Arts & Mathematics for all high school students

The  2018-19 school year was the last school year for a normal assessment cycle. In accordance with the U.S. Department of Education ESEA waiver, assessments were not administered for the 2019-2020 school year and certain accountability requirements were also waived for the 2021-2022 school year in response to the COVID 19 pandemic. Specifically for the 20202-2021 school year, federal accountability and the 95% assessment participation mandates were waived, but states were asked to administer federal assessments. NDE reported the largest drop in assessment participation by Pacific Islander, Hispanic, and Black students. Assessment participation and percentages are impacted, in part, by a decrease in population size.

Note: The most recent year of complete and normal assessment testing cyicle is the 2018-2019 school year. In the updates below, “when compared to the most recent year of testing” refers to the 2018-2019 school year. The following SBAC proficiency rate trends compare results from the 2018-2019 reporting year and the 2020-2021 reporting year.

SBAC English Language Arts (ELA) Proficiency Rate Trends, Grades Grades 3-8

  • Average: ELA showed consistent average growth of 1.3 percentage points. The current rate represents just over 68% of students during the pandemic year.
  • Proficiency: Proficiency rates for the 2020-2021 school year are much lower compared to SY 2018-2019. The largest decreases are among Pacific Islander, Hispanic, and White students. 
  • Student groups: Student groups performed lower when compared to the most recent year of complete testing. Students with disabilities are relatively low, with only a 0.5% drop during the pandemic year.
  • Grade level comparison: There is a greater decrease among elementary grades with less impact on students in grades 6-8.

SBAC Mathematics Proficiency Rate Trends

  • Average: Assessment results reveal an 11.2%  percentage point decrease, with just over 68% of students tested during the pandemic year.
  • Proficiency: Proficiency is much lower when compared to the most recent year of testing. The largest decreases in proficiency are among Pac Islander, Asian, and White students.
  • Student Groups: Students with disabilities have a smaller impact between the two reporting years.
  • Grade level comparison: Results for elementary school students showed a greater decrease, with lower impact in middle school grades 7 & 8.

ACT Results

ACT is Nevada’s federally reported high school English Language Arts (ELA) and Math assessment. Participation in the ACT is a graduation requirement per Nevada Revised Statutes. The ACT was administered to all grade 11 students in the 2019-2020 school year prior to pandemic-related school building closures. NDE was thus able to compare results between the 2019-2020 school year and the 2020-2021 school year. 

High School English Language Arts (HS ELA)

  • Average: ACT data for 2020-2021 represents HS ELA proficiency only rather than proficiency and participation. HS ELA proficiency showed a 2.1% increase during the 2020-2021 pandemic school year. HS ELA proficiency dropped 2.1% in 2020-2021, compared to 2019-2020.
  • Race/Ethnicity: The proficiency rate for Asian students increased. The greatest decreases in HS ELA proficiency results among Pacific Islander, Hispanic, and Black students as well as students identifying as Two or More Races. Black students had to smallest decrease in HS ELA proficiency.
  • Student Groups:  English Learners showed the greatest decrease in HS ELA proficiency.

HS School Mathematics (HS Math)

  • Average: HS Math showed consistent average growth from 2017-2018 to 2019-2020. For the 2020-2021 school year, proficiency decreased by 3.4%.
  • Race/Ethnicity: The greatest decrease in math proficiency was among Asian students who dropped 5.2% points, followed by Two or More Races and White students. Pacific Islander, Black, and American Indian students show the smallest decrease in HS Math proficiency.
  • Student Groups: There is an overall decrease in HS Math proficiency. Students identified as economically disadvantaged showed the greatest decrease.

Presenters noted that participation assessment rates in Clark County, the largest school district in Nevada, were low due to remote learning since tests must be administered in person.

Board members expressed concern about how to interpret the results as many students were not in school buildings and therefore were not available to take tests in person. The board also expressed concerns regarding gaps in the data due to students that were not assessed; requests for more disaggregated data around proficiency, such as a comparison of students proficient before the pandemic year compared to the current school year; concerns about inequity related to the lower test participation rates for Black and other student groups; and concerns about low test scores in some of the assessment criteria. 

Click here to view the SBAC Assessment Results presentation.

Board Approved Teach Nevada Scholarship Awards

The Teach Nevada Scholarship (TNVS) was created in the State General Fund during the 78th Legislative Session (2015) via Senate Bill 511 and is codified in NRS 391A.550 – NRS 391A.590. The scholarship program was continued and slightly modified in the 80th Legislative Session (2019) through appropriations in Senate Bill 555 and Assembly Bill 219. The purpose of TNVS is to provide scholarships to new students pursuing initial teacher licensure programs through state-approved universities, colleges, or alternative routes to licensure (ARL) providers. Awards are granted by the State Board of Education to the extent that money is available within the Fund. 

The Board approved 250 Teach Nevada Scholarship Awards per the Cohort 2022 Table:

Click here to view the TEACH Nevada Scholarship presentation.

Future Agenda Items

Board members requested training for new board members to understand their roles as well as orientations for new board members to meet with key members of departments within the NDE to build relationships.


What happened at the Joint meeting?

Public Comment #1

Members of the public shared public comment on this agenda item regarding:

  • Concerns about staff outsourcing.
  • The need for thoughtful consideration around how unused funds are reallocated as carryover dollars and concerns around how those dollars will be used.
  • The need to clarify ambiguous terms in the reorganization plan, such as “to the greatest extent.”
  • Concerns that the school district is not upholding its requirement to select effective licensed staff policies as outlined in AB469.
  • Concerns about the morale of CCSD staff
  • Concerns about the lack of focus on the needs of students, impacts, and improving outcomes for students.
  • Lack of care or concern by teachers toward students, classes with a lot of subs, lack of communication by teachers to families unless there is a challenge in the classroom.
  • Support and appreciation for SOTs
  • Concerns about whether new principals are sufficiently well-trained to lead schools with high ELL student populations.

Board Discussed the Implementation of Assembly Bill 459 (2017) in First-ever State Board of Education & CCSD Joint Board Meeting

Assembly Bill 469 (2017) required the implementation of a plan to reorganize Clark County School District following the passage of Assembly Bill 394 (2015) which provides principals with increased autonomy over schools and budgets. 

The State Superintendent of Public Instruction was given specific authority over monitoring the implementation of the reorganization. 

At the State Board of Education meeting held on April 15, 2021, the Board discussed components of the implementation plan to be addressed by CCSD as well as problems to be solved by CCSD related to specific criteria. Initial concerns related to the implementation of the bill included how CCSD was facilitating the placement of licensed and qualified teachers in vacant classrooms; purchasing of equipment, services, and supplies; and school carry forward of year‐end balances, in alignment with AB 469. 

In a first-ever joint board meeting between the State Board of Education (SBOE) and Clark County School District (CCSD), SBOE board members and CCSD trustees met to discuss the history of the bill, implementation concerns, implementation items to be resolved, and how to ensure the bill’s successful implementation. 

SBOE is currently reviewing the following items:

  • Principals are reporting they are not being provided with authority as outlined in NAC 388G.110-140 related to Service Level Agreements or the option/ability to carry out transferred responsibilities.
  • Clarification of the definition of “to the greatest extent possible.”
  • Clarification of the definition of “in good standing.”

SBOE is currently monitoring the following items to be resolved by CCSD:

  • Pla​​cement of Licensed and Qualified Teachers and authority to select staff.
  • Negotiating collective bargaining agreements with Clark County Education Association and Education Support Employees Association that are consistent with the law.
  • Addressing the Service Level Agreement (SLA) process in order to provide principals and SOTs with true authority to carry out responsibilities as outlined in NAC 388G.110-140.
  • Authority for purchasing of equipment, services, and supplies.
  • Defining “to the greatest extent possible” and “in good standing.”

CCSD Update on the Current State of the Reorganization

CCSD staff shared an update on the Report on the Organization of the Clark County School District.

Under NRS 388G.810, on or before October 1 of each year, superintendents of large school districts are required to prepare a report with information from the school year before the immediately preceding school year which includes:

  • A summary of the responsibilities for which authority to carry out was transferred to the local school precincts pursuant to NRS 388G.610
  • A summary of the results of the surveys administered pursuant to NRS 388G.800
  • An assessment of the performance of the local school precincts based upon specific measures of achievement which are established by the superintendent on or before January 1 of the immediately preceding school year
  • An assessment of the effectiveness of operating local school precincts and the large school district in the manner set forth in NRS 388G.500 to 388G.810
  • Any recommendations for regulations or legislation to improve the operation of the local school precincts and the large school district in the manner set forth in NRS 388G.500 to 388G.810, inclusive.

During the response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the implementation of full-time distance education and the subsequent return to face-to-face instruction, the District did not produce a report by October 1, 2020. Therefore, CCSD’s report also includes information from the 2018-2019 school year.

CCSD has analyzed AB 469 and shared their findings related to each section, provided in the Report on the Organization of the Clark County School District.

The State Board President shared that the State Board’s goal is to help CCSD achieve the full implementation of the bill; support with clarity, ambiguity, and language; mend the relationship between CCSD Trustees & SBOE; and prevent failure of the implementation.

CCSD Trustees and board members discussed the need to understand what is and isn’t working regarding SOTs. Trustees welcomed thorough training and oversight by the SBOE.

Click here to view the AB469 presentation. 

Click here to view the Report on the Organization of the Clark County School District.


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Nevada Ed-Watch 8/19/2021

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on decisions being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Nevada State Board of Education

What is the State Board of Education & what are they responsible for? The Nevada State Board of Education adopts regulations based on Nevada laws, which are passed down to individual school districts in Nevada to implement. The Board has 11 total (7 appointed and 4 publicly elected) members.

How often does the State Board meet? The Nevada State Board of Education meets once per month on Thursdays at 9:00 AM or 2:00 PM. Click here to see the 2021 Board Meeting Schedule. Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar.

Can community members engage at State Board Meetings? A time for public comment is provided at the beginning (for agenda items) and at the conclusion (on any matter) of each Board meeting. Members of the public may provide public comment in writing via email; public comment will be accepted via email for the duration of the meeting and shared with the State Board of Education during the public comment periods. Public comment may be emailed to NVBoardED@doe.nv.gov.

Click here for a list of all State Board Members.


Thursday, August 19, 2021
Nevada State Board of Education Meeting

Click here to see the meeting agenda

What happened at this meeting?

Public Comment

Members of the public provided comment regarding:

  • Concerns over inequities for rural schools in the state 
  • Concerns over policies relating to transgender students 
  • Concerns over masks and vaccine rollout for students
  • Concerns over the political climate towards educators in regards to masks and COVID-19 policies 
  • Concerns over Critical Race Theory being taught in schools 
  • Concerns over Service Level Agreements and CCSD’s compliance with Nevada Law.  

President’s Report

  • Back to School Update 
    • The board expressed gratitude to educators and staff for their efforts in kicking off the new school year. 
    • Board President Ortiz emphasized the need to pay attention to the social and emotional needs of students as they return to school. 
  • Board Goals & Vision Communications Plan
    • The board heard an update on the communications plan for the Nevada Board of Education Goals and Vision. Highlights: 
      • The SBOE’s two goals are 1) move up in State rankings from 18th in September 2020 to Top 10 by July 2026 and 2)  increase the overall number of students receiving the College and Career Ready (CCR) diploma from 23.9% in July 2021 to 50% by July 2026 and eliminate gaps of student groups while raising the overall average.
      • Goal messaging: The goal of the communications plan is to establish Nevada’s current academic achievement ranking clearly to Nevada stakeholders; clearly communicate the two State Board of Education (SBOE) goals so that the general public knows and understands them; and illustrate the Vision of the SBOE in a way the public can understand and connect with.  
      • Vision: The Vision of the SBOE is that All Nevada students are equipped and feel empowered to obtain their vision of success.
      • Strategic Timeframes: By Spring 2022, SBOE will share about how each stated goal is reached. In Fall 2022, the SBOE will communicate ongoing progress reports.
      • The SBOE will be putting together a toolkit for promotion including social media graphics, email templates, and other assets that the board and other stakeholders can use. 

Click here to view the Communications Plan presentation.

Superintendent’s Report

  • Covid-19 Response
    • All staff regardless of vaccination status are required to wear masks. 
    • School-based Covid testing options are being explored. 
  • Summer Literacy Camps 
    • Over 200 students participated in the Nevada LIT Camps program, which ​​offered early childhood reading instruction for students in K-5 as well as teacher professional development instructional planning. 
  • Digital Ambassadors Cohort
    • 42 educators across the state will be working to provide digital support as Digital Ambassadors as part of the Nevada Digital Learning Collaborative. 

Board Approved Consent Agenda 

Consent agenda highlights: 

Board Heard Petition for License Revocation of Julia Kerrigan 

NRS 391.320 enables the State Board of Education to suspend or revoke a teacher’s license for any cause specified by law, including ethics violations. If a teacher violates ethics law, a petition for suspension or revocation can be filed. Teachers can ask for a hearing within 15 days to present their case. After that, the case is brought to the SBOE who makes a final determination and can do one of three things:

  • Accept the recommendation for the suspension or revocation;
  • Reject the recommendation for the suspension or revocation; or
  • Bring the report back to the hearing officer for further evidence and recommendation.

In the case of Julia Kerrigan, a petition for revocation was filed due to allegations made by students that Kerrigan helped students with tests by telling them how to solve test questions. The board approved the recommendation made by the hearing officer to suspend Kerrigan’s license for five years from the date of decision by the board.

Board Heard Update Regarding the Efforts of Workforce Connections

The mission of Workforce Connections is to connect employers to a ready workforce. Workforce Connections is Southern Nevada’s local workforce development board currently serving the Clark, Esmeralda, Nye, and Lincoln with its One-Stop Career Centers. The organization is currently working on a number of initiatives that benefit K-12 education:

  • Fellowship Program: Workforce Connections’ Fellowship Program, in partnership with CCSD, will create a pipeline for in-demand careers of the future, the first program of its kind in the nation. There are currently 13 CCSD high schools in the fellowship with a goal to get all 59 CCSD high schools involved.
  • CSSD Technical Training Academy: A new academy school will be developed in what was once the site of Bishop Gorman on Maryland Parkway. For the first time, a Workforce Connections One-Stop career center will live on a school campus. The goal of this initiative is not just to help the youth, but to help families of the youth through a generational approach and wraparound services.
  • ACT Work Ready Communities: Clark County became the largest work-ready community through ACT. The program includes 12 job profilers that will help employers apply a Work Ready Certificate to identify and hire the right person the first time to fill a role.
  • CCSD apprenticeship pipeline: The apprenticeship pipeline will align trades organizations with CCSD for students choosing to go directly into a career. Due to COVID, the program has been challenging to deploy.
  • Workforce Blueprint – The Workforce Blueprint will give students information about the industries that are arising in Southern Nevada.
  • Industry Sector Partnerships: Workforce Connections, in partnership with the Vegas Chamber, will work closely with Southern Nevada companies in fields such as logistics and supply chain management to understand the entire blueprint of their workforce needs and what they look for in future employees. This could include certificates employers look for, how companies grow an individual into middle management, and how individuals reach the top. The program will launch in October with a focus on two out of seven emerging industries to start.
  • NevadaV Business Hubs: The Nevada Business Hub is designed to connect employers to all available free resources available to help them create a plan for the future.

Click here to view the Workforce Connections presentation.

Board Heard Overview on Assembly Bill (AB)  469 (2017)

Assembly Bill 469 (2017) required the implementation of a plan to reorganize Clark County School District following the passage of Assembly Bill 394 (2015) which provides principals with increased autonomy over schools and budgets. 

The board heard a presentation on the history of AB469. Its history includes passage of the bill in 2017, an issuance of the Attorney General’s opinion in 2018 at the request of the Superintendent to answer the question of whether a large school district could assign a teacher to a local school precinct without its consent, a declaratory order in 2020 to answer the question of whether state statute would allow CCSD to assign an employee in a school without the school’s consent, and service level agreements.

Click here to view the AB469 presentation.


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Nevada Ed-Watch 7/15/21

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on decisions being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Nevada State Board of Education

What is the State Board of Education & what are they responsible for? The Nevada State Board of Education adopts regulations based on Nevada laws, which are passed down to individual school districts in Nevada to implement. The Board has 11 total (7 appointed and 4 publicly elected) members.

How often does the State Board meet? The Nevada State Board of Education meets once per month on Thursdays at 9:00 AM or 2:00 PM. Click here to see the 2021 Board Meeting Schedule. Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar.

Can community members engage at State Board Meetings? A time for public comment is provided at the beginning (for agenda items) and at the conclusion (on any matter) of each Board meeting. Members of the public may provide public comment in writing via email; public comment will be accepted via email for the duration of the meeting and shared with the State Board of Education during the public comment periods. Public comment may be emailed to NVBoardED@doe.nv.gov.

Click here for a list of all State Board Members.


Thursday, July 15, 2021
Nevada State Board of Education Meeting

Click here to see the meeting agenda

What happened at this meeting?

Public Comment

Members of the public provided comment regarding:

  • Concern over masks and vaccine rollout for students in Carson City
  • Concern for the welfare and safety of Carson City students in regards to vaccines, masks, and the city’s school reopening plan
  • Concerns regarding the welfare and morale of educational support professionals

President’s Report

The president and board welcomed a new board member, Russell Hecht, Superintendent of Schools in Pershing County and the immediate past president of the Nevada Association of School Superintendents (NASS). He will replace current board member, Mike Walker. 

Superintendent’s Report

  • 21st Century Community Learning Center Grant Awards: The 21st Century Community Learning Center program supports the creation of community learning centers that provide academic enrichment opportunities during non-school hours for children, particularly students who attend high-poverty and low-performing schools. The Nevada Department of Education announced the award of $7M to 13 partners across the state to support out-of-school activities.
  • Nevada Association of School Superintendents (NASS) Conference: The board discussed the upcoming NASS conference. Ongoing details will be provided throughout the development of the conference.
  • Federal Relief Funding Update: Nevada has received roughly $9B in federal relief funds. Nevada school districts receiving fund allocations are required to submit a plan for the safe return to in-person instruction and continuity of services to the Nevada Department of Education by July 14, 2021. By September 10, 2021, districts are also required to submit their ARP ESSER funding plans.
  • Additional updates:
    • The board shared congratulations for Sarah Nick, the new Education Programs Professional, who is moving from the executive team to the Office of Student and School Supports. 
    • The Division of Business and Support Services has been renamed Student Support Services. 
    • The board wished Board President Ortiz a happy birthday. 

Board Approved Consent Agenda 

Consent agenda highlights: 

Board Heard Update on the 81st Legislative Session

The Board heard updates following the close of the 81st Legislative Session, including an update regarding the Pupil-Centered Funding Plan.

Legislation filed on the Nevada Department of Education’s behalf and successfully passed: 

  • SB439: Pupil-Centered Funding Plan
  • AB38: Work-based learning
  • AB67: Discipline clarity 
  • AB417: School bus safety
  • SB36: Crises management 
  • SB215: Blue ribbon commission 
  • AB419: Standards

The presentation also covered all of the bills that will be managed by the State Board of Education in order to ensure proper reporting and accountability. 

The Nevada Department of Education is currently in the regulatory work and stakeholder engagement section of the 2021-2022 legislative implementation plan. The next stage will be forming and conducting interim committees before beginning the budget and bill draft requests for the 2023 legislative session. 

2021 legislative session funding bills: 

  • Standard Budget Bills
    • AB-494: Appropriations Act (general Funds)
    • SB-459: Authorizations Act (federal funds)
    • SB-458: K-12 funding bill 
  • Budget Implementation Bill
    • SB-439: Pupil-Centered Funding Plan 
  • Other Education Finance Bills
    • AB-495: Mining tax bill, ARP funds for education 
    • SB-463: PCFP – Supplemental payments to charter schools. 

Board members shared requests for clarification on requirement changes of the board in terms of regulatory matters, requests for per-pupil spending data in Nevada in comparison to other states, and concerns over infusion of federal funds without a plan for lasting change once these funds are no longer available.

Click here to view the legislative update presentation.
Click here to view a presentation on the budget approved during the legislative session and the Pupil-Centered Funding Plan. 

Board Approved Vision Statement and Goals Aligned to Silver State Governance

The Board approved a new organizational vision statement: All Nevada students are equipped and feel empowered to attain their vision of success.

The Board will continue their work regarding the development of goals to monitor student outcomes as outlined by Silver State Governance. As part of this work, the SBOE has attended Silver State governance training and conducted a self-assessment in order to grow in student focused governance and create goals to monitor student outcomes.

The board also approved two final goals and discussed one proposed goal aligned to these outcomes:  

  • Approved Goals
    • The Nevada Education System will move up in state rankings from 18th as of September 2020 to Top 10 by July 2026 as measured by the academic portions of the Quality Counts K-12 student achievement data.
    • Increase the overall number of students receiving their CCR diploma from 23.9% on July 31, 2021 to 50% on July 31, 2026 and eliminate gaps of student subgroups while raising the overall average. 
  • Proposed Goal
    • Improve statewide culture and climate survey from the statewide score of 365 on July 31, 2020 to Y on July 31, 2026. This goal is on hold until the SBOE can receive a presentation with accurate data  

Throughout the goal development process, the SBOE discussed appropriate language for each goal, what goal benchmarks should be set in regards to the state’s ranking and diploma attainment, and their concerns for goal success based on varying statewide and region-specific factors. 

After approving the vision statement and two goals, the SBOE discussed guardrails for the two approved goals. Guardrails are “thou shalt not” phrases, the bumpers that will keep the board in line. 

Guardrails:

  • The State Superintendent will not propose major decisions that pertain to these goals to the Board without first having engaged students, families, and staff. 
  • We will not negatively impact student achievement of any student subgroup based on these goals. 
    • The above guardrails were not voted on, but they were decided as being the main guardrails as of now. The board wanted to pass them on to the State Superintendent for review and discussion. 

Other considered guardrails: 

  • We will not overinflate star ratings over individual student outcomes. 
  • We will not move from a standard diploma without the rigor of the coursework to achieve the CCR diploma. 
  • We will not allow our overall graduation rate to drop. 
  • We will not narrow the breadth and rigor of curriculum being taught. 
  • We will not consider the results of student data without also considering their social emotional and mental health of the students and staff. 
  • We will not allow academic gaps between subgroups. 

The State Superintendent and staff will come back with their thoughts and review on the approved goals. The SBOE will then finalize their third goal, guardrails, and decide on interim goals. 

Click here to view the evaluation rubric.

Future Agenda Items

The board submitted requests for future agenda items including brainstorming possible regulatory options and a review of recent reorganization outcomes.


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Nevada Ed-Watch 6/4/2021

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on decisions being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Nevada State Board of Education

What is the State Board of Education & what are they responsible for? The Nevada State Board of Education adopts regulations based on Nevada laws, which are passed down to individual school districts in Nevada to implement. The Board has 11 total (7 appointed and 4 publicly elected) members.

How often does the State Board meet? The Nevada State Board of Education meets once per month on Thursdays at 9:00AM. Click here to see the 2021 Board Meeting Schedule. Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar.

Can community members engage at State Board Meetings? A time for public comment is provided at the beginning (for agenda items) and at the conclusion (on any matter) of each Board meeting. Members of the public may provide public comment in writing via email; public comment will be accepted via email for the duration of the meeting and shared with the State Board of Education during the public comment periods. Public comment may be emailed to NVBoardED@doe.nv.gov.

Click here for a list of all State Board Members.


Thursday, June 3, 2021
Nevada State Board of Education Meeting

Click here to see the meeting agenda

What happened at this meeting?

Public Comment

Members of the public provided comment regarding:

  • Concerns about the implementation of AB 469 and its impacts on student achievement, vulnerable student populations, and school funding 
  • Concerns about the implementation of and ongoing training for School Organizational Teams 
  • Call for support on efforts to create well-informed parent groups   

President’s Report

  • President Ortiz congratulated the 2021 National Teacher of the Year, Juliana  Urtubey, NBCT. Juliana is the first National Teacher of the Year from Nevada. 
    • Click here to read about this in the Nevada Independent 
  • President Ortiz welcomed Christina Nguyen as the new State Board of Education Student Representative.
  • Two Nevada students were among 161 high school seniors announced by the U.S. Department of Education Secretary, Dr. Miguel Cardona, as the 57th class of U.S. Presidential Scholars. The Presidential Scholars program recognizes students for their accomplishments in academics, the arts, and career and technical education fields. 
    • Nevada’s 2021 Presidential Scholars are: 
      • Derek Lin Chien, Davidson Academy of Nevada, Reno
      • Priyanka Senthil, Davidson Academy of Nevada, Reno
  • Two Southern Nevada schools have been designated as Purple Star Schools, a new honor recognizing schools for their outstanding commitment to military families and their unique needs.
    • Nevada’s Purple Star Schools are:
      • Robert O. Gibson Leadership Academy 
      • Ernest A. Becker, Sr. Middle School 

Superintendent’s Report

  • COVID-19 Update
    • Beginning in the 2021-2022 school year, some districts will continue to provide distance learning options for students. 
    • The Department of Education has met with more than 12 community stakeholder groups to gather information from communities across Nevada to determine the most effective use of $1.5 billion dollars of the American Rescue Plan funds, in support of recovering from the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on education.  After gathering additional feedback, a plan will be drafted and publicly posted for public input for 30 days. The plan will then be submitted to the U.S. Department of Education in July. Superintendent Ebert instructed members of the public to contact snick@doe.nv.gov if they would like to be involved in a stakeholder meeting. Once the plan is drafted, it will be publicly posted with a 30-day window for public input. The plan will be submitted to the U.S. Department of Education in July.  
  •  Nevada Digital Learning Collaborative Symposium 
    • 300 educators attended the Nevada Digital Learning Collaborative Symposium to learn about distance learning in the digital age, and how to most effectively adapt to distance learning methods as they become more prevalent. 

Board Approved Consent Agenda 

Consent agenda highlights:

Board Heard Presentations on Clark County School District’s Implementation of AB-469 (2017) 

At the April State Board of Education meeting, Board members were provided with a presentation from department staff regarding an analysis of the implementation of Assembly Bill 469 (2017). The following priorities were identified for further information: 

  1. Complying with the requirement to grant principals control of teacher selection and placement; cases still exist where the central office assigns teachers to schools.
  2. Negotiating collective bargaining agreements with CCEA and ESEA that are consistent with the law (SB 224)
  3. Complying with the requirement to grant principals the freedom to determine which services, suppliers, and equipment to acquire; cases still exist where the central office is unacceptably constraining the range of principal choice with respect to certain services, suppliers, and equipment
  4. Providing schools precincts with access to carry forward funds early enough for schools to purchase additional personnel positions and instructional supports.

Members of various school communities, including principals and members of School Organizational Teams and representatives from collective bargaining units provided presentations on their experiences with their concerns about the implementation of the above-stated priorities. 

Clark County School District personnel also provided information regarding collective bargaining agreements, specific legal findings, and precedent to support their perspective on the implementation of the reorganization. 

Board members directed CCSD staff to further investigate the appropriate implementation of the Nevada Educator Performance Framework, provide a feedback system for rural schools to have more flexibility with Service Level Agreements, and improve processes and communication related to school budget carryover money. Board members requested this item come back before the board at a future meeting.  


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Nevada Ed-Watch 4/15/2021

The Ed-Watch series is designed to increase access to information on decisions being made regarding public education in Clark County and Nevada.


Nevada State Board of Education

What is the State Board of Education & what are they responsible for? The Nevada State Board of Education adopts regulations based on Nevada laws, which are passed down to individual school districts in Nevada to implement. The Board has 11 total (7 appointed and 4 publicly elected) members.

How often does the State Board meet? The Nevada State Board of Education meets once per month on Thursdays at 9:00AM. Click here to see the 2021 Board Meeting Schedule. Click here to visit Hope For Nevada’s #NVEd Calendar.

Can community members engage at State Board Meetings? A time for public comment is provided at the beginning (for agenda items) and at the conclusion (on any matter) of each Board meeting. Members of the public may provide public comment in writing via email; public comment will be accepted via email for the duration of the meeting and shared with the State Board of Education during the public comment periods. Public comment may be emailed to NVBoardED@doe.nv.gov.

Click here for a list of all State Board Members.


Thursday, April 15, 2021
Nevada State Board of Education Meeting

Click here to see the meeting agenda

What happened at this meeting?

Public Comment

Members of the public provided comment regarding:

  • Concerns that school principals lack autonomy
  • A need for guidance for SOTs to provide feedback on experiences with school staff
  • Concerns about the employee reassignment process

President’s Report

  • Silver State Governance Training
    • The Silver State Governance training supports boards in developing goals and guardrails to ensure that the board is focused on students and student outcomes. On April 9, 2021, the SBOE held a work session to begin drafting a new organizational vision focused on student outcomes in Nevada. SBOE will be scheduling an additional work session to continue the development of the draft. The draft vision speaks to ensuring that all Nevada students are equipped and feel empowered to foresee the future of their choosing as a result of collective efforts. SBOE will be seeking public feedback on the draft vision.

Superintendent’s Report

  • Legislative Update
    • Friday, April 9, was the deadline for bills in the Nevada Legislature to pass out of the houses in which they were entered. All six of the Nevada Department of Education’s (NDE) bills passed out of their respective houses. There were several amendments that were made to improve the bills.  Assembly Bill 265 regarding Alternative Routes to Licensure for administrators will receive no further action because it did not pass out of its first house committee pursuant to the April deadline.
  • Pupil-Centered Funding Plan Update
    • On April 7, the NDE participated in a workshop with the Senate Committee on Finance and the Senate Committee on Ways and Means to discuss the pupil-centered funding plan and is also working with the Commission on School Funding. Superintendent Ebert shared that the funding formula should provide additional transparency to the use of education funds. Currently, the Nevada Legislature is considering a phased approach to implementing the formula and the NDE anticipates it moving forward. 

Click here to read the Pupil-Centered Funding Plan Summary.

  • Blue Ribbon Commission for a Globally Prepared Nevada Update
    • SBOE is currently working with the Blue Ribbon Commission to begin implementation planning for competency-based learning.

Board Approved Consent Agenda 

Consent agenda highlights:

Board Approved Appointee to the State Public Charter School Authority Governing Board

The Nevada Department of Education is allotted two appointments to the State Public Charter School Authority (SPCSA) board. The SPCSA is the governing body that authorizes the opening and operation of public charter schools throughout the state.

The board approved a motion to appoint Erica Mosca as the SBOE designee. 

Applications for the appointment were open through March 2021 and screened by the Nevada Department of Education.  

Click here to view SPCSA appointee applications.

Board Heard Update Clark County School District’s Implementation of AB-469 (2017) 

Assembly Bill 469 (2017) required the implementation of a plan to reorganize Clark County School District following the passage of Assembly Bill 394 (2015) which provides principals with increased autonomy over schools and budgets. 

The State Superintendent of Public Instruction was given specific authority over monitoring the implementation of the reorganization. As such, the following components have been identified as necessary to be addressed by CCSD:

  • Authority to select school staff
  • Assignment of central staff to schools
  • Allocation funds to schools
  • Purchase of equipment, services, and supplies available from the district by schools
  • School carry forward of year‐end balance (e.g. school carryover funds)
  • Weighted per‐pupil funding

The Department identified the following problems to be solved by CCSD related to three of the six criteria:

  1. Complying with the requirement to grant principals control of teacher selection and placement; cases still exist where the central office assigns teachers to schools.
  2. Negotiating collective bargaining agreements with CCEA and ESEA that are consistent with the law (SB 224)
  3. Complying with the requirement to grant principals the freedom to determine which services, suppliers, and equipment to acquire; cases still exist where the central office is unacceptably constraining the range of principal choice with respect to certain services, suppliers, and equipment
  4. Providing schools precincts with access to carry forward funds early enough for schools to purchase additional personnel positions and instructional supports.

Board members discussed the need to determine the timely use of carryover dollars, the need for systems improvement to select licensed teachers, the need for solutions that help principals think outside the box to impact student outcomes, the potential for regulation that will give principals better access to carryover funds, and student outcomes-focused budget training for principals.

The Board plans to schedule work sessions with CCSD to understand its challenges and determine specific areas of support.

Click here to view the presentation.

Click here to view CCSD’s 2018 Plan for the Implementation of Actions to Finalize Compliance with AB 469.

Requests For Future Agenda Items

  • A summary of key education-related bills following the close of the Legislative session
  • A breakdown of any changes in responsibilities for the SBOE following bill decisions
  • A working session on the SBOE’s vision and goals
  • A statewide report detailing efforts on academic recovery of students related to the impact of COIVD-19


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